Life&Culture

Stream This Week's Best New Albums From Taylor Swift, Kamaiyah, And More

Stream This Week's Best New Albums From Taylor Swift, Kamaiyah, And More

Her album before this, 1989, was released in 2014 and had its own share of problems with iTunes.

"When this album comes out, gossip blogs will scour the lyrics for the men they can attribute to each song, as if the inspiration for music is as simple and basic as a paternity test", she writes. AKA you can't listen to the full album on demand, but you can listen to a radio station that plays Swift's back catalogue with songs from the new album sprinkled in. Well, first of all, yes, we can assume there will definitely be a tour thanks to her collaboration with Ticketmaster #VerifiedFan, which aims to give fans better access to tickets. While there's no official word, sources say that Swift will hold back the album for at least a week and possibly longer, although those sources also say it's likely a final decision has not yet been made.

Taylor Swift's new album, "Reputation", is now available in retail stores and online outlets, but as an earlier report from Bloomberg anticipated, the album is absent from major streaming services like Apple Music and Spotify.

Swift removed her music from streaming platforms shortly before the release of "1989", decrying the services' royalty payments.

With an album title like Reputation, fans speculated whether the entire album would be a vindictive screed aimed at Swift's enemies. The kicker is her explicit reference to the speakerphone call during which Kim recorded her, as Swift continues, "And therein lies the issue/Friends don't try to trick you/Get you on the phone and mind-twist you/And so I took an ax to a mended fence". "There will be slideshows of photos backing up each incorrect theory, because it's 2017 and if you didn't see a picture of it, it couldn't have happened right?" Does that mean she'll be dropping tour dates at the end of the month?

"This is why we can't have nice things, darling", goes the chorus. To follow the song's metaphor, Hiddleston is the getaway vehicle driver who whisks Swift away from another man ("Well he was running after us / I was screaming 'Go go go!'").